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20121118
20121118
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what kind of leverage does the u.s. have? >> president obama has pledged $1 billion in aid to the egyptian government. that money is incredibly important to the egyptians. their economy has been faltering. in addition, the egyptian military receives almost $1.3 billion per year from the united states. in addition, the egyptian government is looking for support from other actors, like the international monattorney fund and the european union. so all of that-- the money that the egyptian government needs, the u.s. leverage to try to get the egyptians to bring peace to to conflict. >> brennan: juan zarate, thank you. >> thank you. >> brennan: in egypt today, at least 49 children were killed when a train smashed into a school bus. 1190 miles sowpght of cairo. the force of the crash broke the bus in half, and the destruction made it difficult to count and identify bodies. the man in charge of closing the gates at the crossing has been arrested. authorities say he was sleeping when the bus crossed the tracks. two oil workers remain lost at sea
are meeting to consider the nomintation of general joseph dunford, jr., to be the next commander of the u.s. forces in afghanistan and commander of the international security assistance force. this morning's meeting was originally scheduled to cinsider general john allen to be supreme allied commander. general allen currently holds the positions that general dunford is nominated. however, earlier this week, the department of defense requested general allen's hearing be put on hold pending a department of defense inspector general review. we have agreed and we hope the review can be completed promptly. general dunford is a distinguished military career with over 25 years of military service. he is truly the assistant commandant of the marine corps and has commended combat forces in iraq. general, we thank you for your many years of service and for your willingness to, once again, enter the call to serve this nation. -- answer the call to serve. let me also extend our thanks to your family whose support is so essential. as the tradition of this committee, i invite you to introduce your wife a
messages. last year, you have a press release that said the u.s. has not seen any spillover violence. saying that when we are acknowledging that our law enforcement has been engaged in a gun battle. we have had people killed. narcotics have been caught. that is what is competing this. we need to recognize it for what it is. transnational criminal organizations -- we cannot pursue them across the international border. we will put what ever it takes to defend the sovereignty -- >> he made a point that there was a bill to fund more border patrol agents. i think it is well-known that republicans in washington do not like to spend a lot of money. his comments were that members of your own party do not want to fund this initiative. >> people are tired of blaming parties. >> that is exactly what i just said. [laughter] before you did that, you blamed republicans. [talking over each other] >> i acknowledge that president bush and president obama have increased the number of border patrol. i acknowledge that we have an increase of resources. when you have a disparity of resources in other sta
arafat. in 1978, u.s. president jimmy carter helped to broker the peace accords between saadat of egypt and prime minister ba begin of israel which paved the way for the 1979 peace treaty between those two countries. the lalt '80s saw the formation of hamas in the west bank and gaza erasing hopes. the oslo accords signed -- establishing recognition of each side between israel and the plo. years of talks followed and marred by disagreement. mahmoud abbas is elected as arafat's successor by the palestinian people. in the same year, israel withdraws from all settlements in gaz in. hamas then wins big in the elections sending a ripple of worry around the world. since then, the back and forth continued with no definitive end to the conflict. let's be clear, this cribbed version of history doesn't begin to explore the complexity. in fact, i sort of picked and chose which moments of the timeline to highlight, which sa i controversial approach to the story of the middle east. even the starting point that i chose can be deemed controversial. others may begin at britain's involvement or in the 19
. meanwhile, u.s. officials moving to deescalate the rising violence, advising israel not to enter gaza, fearing it could draw egypt in to that consulate. and joining us the consulate general, good to see you ambassador. >> thank you for having me. >> dave: the latest what we just said. benjamin netanyahu told the cabinet he's ready to significantly be expand its operation in gaza. is israel prepared for a ground invasion into gaza and what could incite that? >> look the mandate from the inception was to remove this strategic threat posed by thousands of rockets on israelis-- innocent israelis paralyzing our entire southern region. so the goal was to remove that threat and the mandate given to the defense forces from the government was not limited in time nor in scope. so in other words, the possibility of israel moving in with ground forces certainly exists, it depends how the operation develops on the ground. right now, hamas is firing rockets. hamas is still displaying a tremendous degree of aggression towards israel and the purpose of this operation is to eliminate that threat. >> m
, but that all changed for me in october of 2008 when i got a call from my boss, u.s. attorney, mike garcia. he called me in the office, and i have the oh, my god, it's the principal's office feeling in the pit of the stomach. he handed me a printout, special inspector general, it was a piece of the legislation that congress passed authorizing treasury to borrow $700 billion to rescue wall street, bail out the banks, put us on a path supposedly to economic recovery. this piece i was not aware of was when they passed the law, congress created a brand new agency. when mike explained to me what was the agency was going to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to
, and wednesday, one of the biggest travel days of the year traditionally looks pretty good across the u.s., we're just going to have that system in the west to contend with once again. and by thanksgiving day, plenty to be thankful for, we're looking at clear skies for the macy's thanksgiving day parade. and in the midwest, chicago 62 degrees. >> julie martin, thank you. >>> when we come back, a visit to turkey town, u.s.st. of medicare and social security. anncr: but you deserve straight talk about the options on the... table and what they mean for you and your family. ancr: aarp is cutting through all the political spin. because for our 37 million members, only one word counts. get the facts at earnedasay.org. let's keep medicare... and social security strong for generations to come. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue i
. on a national basis, if x sales are in the u.s., x percent are taxed in the u.s., period. ten% of your global sales and to the united states are taxed. >> what is wrong with that idea? >> i would have to look at the arithmetic. what we are doing now is in the face of what every country does. it provides very strong -- american corporations probably have something close to $2 trillion abroad in funds that they do not want to bring back. they will instead find ways of buying companies abroad are opening new plants abroad because the penalty for bringing it back is often high. if our corporate income were down, the penalty would be less. we want to somehow get around that said they feel free to bring it back. >> what is your take on the issue and is there a windfall coming back to the united states? we have had a lot of business folks say we're going to put this money to use if you drop this and we can repatriate this money. >> temporary repatriation. the economic studies suggest and has little to no impact on observable economic outcomes. abbas just the evidence is it would not [indiscernible]
by egypt and turkey obviously with the pressure of the u.s. and great britain, or are we going to see that ground invasion by israel? prime minister netanyahu said today they are ready to expand their ground operation. we know egypt and turkey are working feverishly to strike some sort of deal, but the signal, the sounds coming out of jerusalem is they aren't finished with this operation yet, but certainly here in gaza people are hoping that some sort of cease-fire will come about very soon. >> thanks to alex, and now let's bring in abc's global affairs anchor christiane amanpour who joins us from jerusalem. christiane, what is the situation there militarily? are there still fears of a ground war? >> reporter: martha, from the military point of view, they want to just get rid of as much of hamas' rocket-launching capability as possible. i just talked to a senior military official here, an israeli official, who said they seemed to be quite pleased with what they've done so far. in about a thousand sorties, they've taken out quite a lot of the rocket-launching capability, so if there is
of this system, paid for partly with u.s. tax money, they will see amazingly effective antimissile technology at work. and that's said to be 90% successful. it discriminates between the missiles that are going to hit cities and the ones that are just going to land in the woods and takes out the ones that are headed for cities. so it's a potential game changer here. >> schieffer: all right, well, david you'll be back if our rowntable later in the broadcast. i want to turn now to john mccain, a member of the armed services committee, the ranking republican on armed services. senator, what can the united states do here? obviously, no bon wants this thing to spiral out of control. >> well, the united states, obviously, should be as heavily involved as they possibly can. i'm not sure how much influence that this administration has. the president's first priority in 2009 was the israeli-palestinnian peace process. obviously, there was no progress there, and there are various reasons for it. we won't waste the time. i think several things make this issue very dangerous. one is egypt and the whole ch
the fiscal cliff this week for a few minutes to meet with members of the 2012, u.s. olympic team the this photo released by the white house today, shows, mr. obama immitating, silver medalist, not impressed look. the expregs wssion was caught. they're having fun with it. the president was an avid watcher of the olympics and talked to all five members of the gymnastics team by phone after they within gold this summer while he was on the campaign trail in ohio. >>> now for a look at sports. time to check in with comcast sportsnet. henry, two important football games tonight. then a third one t. that i am interested in too. big games. talking about a gymnast. give you something to flip over. if you can't get enough football. you've will love what we have coming up for you. rivals. usc/ucla. and former raiders' coach, gruden returns to the bay. nothing but love for the silver and black. guess what he will do tomorrow. it might surprise you. sports is next. frigidaire we introduced the first home freezer. the first pulsator agitator washer. we created a host of innovations that have h
is currently the permanent representative to the united nations for the u.s. she has not yet been officially nominated for the state department job to replace hillary clinton who intends to resign probably. rice is rumored to be underactive and positive consideration. but republicans and some democrats have been angry with ms. rice for saying that the attack in benghazi that left four americans dead was spontaneous and not preplanned. >> what our assessment is as of the present is, in fact, it began spontaneously in benghazi as a reaction to what had transpired some hours earlier in cairo where, of course, as you know, there was a violent protest outside of our embassy, sparked by this hateful video. we do not have information at present that leads to us conclude that this was premeditated or preplanned. >> ms. rice made these comments five days after intelligence reports were reporting otherwise. be that as it may, at his press conference on wednesday of this week, president obama voiced outrage with senators mccain and graham. >> when they go after the u.n. ambassador, apparently because t
talking points memo would have been run through the justice department and other u.s. intelligence agencies before it was given to lawmakers. >> harris: thank you hole molly. we'll learn more about the libya probe and general petraeus' resignation from senator saxby chambliss vice chair of the senate intelligence committee and senator lieberman. both men appearing exclusive on fox news sunday tomorrow check your local listings for times. >>> right now we are checking for the latest on the the survivors on that story in midland, texas where some of our war veterans were hurt while traveling through town in a celebration. here are picture from the parade float that got hit by a train. tonight how the injuredt]c are doing. their conditions. and the outpouring of support from those close-knit community members, coming to help. >> new word from the ntsb about what happened in the final seconds before that crash. >> also, answering the call to serve once again. former members of our armed services lending a hand in the wake of superstorm sandy. >> reporter: we are in the city of new york
iraq and more recently when he was top commander of all u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan and in that later job i did travel around the country with him. he would give remarkable access to journalists. oftentimes it was under very strict ground rules that things were off the record but he did open himself up to press coverage because he thought it was important for the mission to get recognized out there, but also i believe because he also liked to see himself at the center of the coverage. >> so that remarkable access paid dividends for petraeus's image. would you say, would you argue with the notion that many of the jurmts who dealt with him, who know him, have tended to go easy on him on this unfortunate scandal? >> i think some have. others have been a little harder edged and fairer, but, look. that access could be intoxicating. you were in that exclusive bubble. he would bring you in to meetings he would have with subordinate commanders, at times even into sessions that involved secret material that you were told you couldn't right about. you get to zip around the bat
. he believed in bringing democracy to the world, and she thought the u.s. had been involved in iran and iraq and the most heinous and criminal way from the 1953 overthrow, i do have to give the whole history, and here, that it was an attempt to overthrow a terrible despot, unemployment rate the country. and bring a democratic movement. it may not have been executed well. it may have built. you may not agree with it but he really believed that, and that's why he supported it. it was not so that he could be contrary or to reliance of in a way that he would be perceived as unpredictable. so i don't think he ever tried to cultivate the bad boy image, and i don't think he was a bad boy. >> i will say that he did have a flutter for showmanship, and it wasn't lost on them with reputation. >> that's true. >> or he did say once the thought of preventive war gave him an erection. >> say what? >> the thought to prevent war gave him an erection. >> yeah if that's a bit speed i didn't remember that one. [laughter] but as for kissinger, i do think it's done with them because they have reissued hi
believed all along the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in libya was a terrorist strike, even though that wasn't how the obama administration initially described it publicly. representative peter king of new york said petraeus had briefed the house intelligence committee on september 14, and he does not recall petraeus being so positive at the time that it was a terrorist attack. he thought all along that he made it clear there was terrorist involvement, king said. that was not my recollection. so senator feinstien, did petraeus contradict himself or has he contradicted the white house's version of events? >> we have a transcript of that meeting on that day. and petraeus very clearly said that it was a terrorist attack. and outlined who he thought might be involved in it. so any -- >> this is right after the attack? >> that's the day after the attack. i think there's no question about it. what has concerned me about this is really the politicization of a public statement that was put out by the entire intelligence committee, which susan rice on the 16th, who was asked to go before th
like. check out this graph of u.s. government from google. these are requests that don't require warrants and this doesn't include the security related requests not disclosed. for awhile, i thought the combination of these trends, the u bik wiity of technology was pushing us to a future where citizens would be unable to keep their secrets while the government keeps its secrets. i feared it would end up totally exposed to each other and the state. the state and its doing and what it's doing in our name would be a mystery. then miraculously, but also inevitably, they collided with each other in the petraeus affair. the four-star general's communications with broadwell reveal a lot of mundane personal failings. really, it seems not anything scandalous as far as the public's fear goes. the only possible scandal, as far as i can tell, is the conditions which the fbi came to read the private e-mails of petraeus and broadwell. the investigation began because jill kelley, an acquaintance of petraeus served as the unpaid liaison in tampa received hostile e-mails that chastised her for fli
and rallo have -- geraldo have been to these areas abroad. when people disengage from home life in the u.s. and go to deployed areas, it's a parallel reality. everything switches off. let's not forget that a lot of them are men who are of a certain age that are maybe in their early 50s to early 60s, and they are vulnerable and a susceptible like all men. >> four star general petraeus and allen are the highest in rank to get snagged in scandal. another current case involved jeffrey sinclair. >> 82nd air born commander, having untoward sexual relations with junior officers, you know, putting them under tremendous pressure to do all kinds of unbecoming things. >> how do you think these scandals will affect morale. >> convincing a bunch of young troopers who are 18, 19, 20 years old, hormones are flowing. they're deployed a together, mae and female, and they look to their most senior officers. this is what they see. it makes everybody's job a lot harder. >> i'm shocked, craig, that there's not more of this given the sexual integration of the armed t forces. women are everywhere now. they are e
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)